WordPress: Categories vs. Tags — A User Guide

Many bloggers have asked me to explain in depth about using WordPress Categories and Tags, and the difference between the two.

First, let’s take a look at the definitions as they are explained in WordPress’ own documentation:

Categories provide a helpful way to group related posts together, and to quickly tell readers what a post is about. Categories also make it easier for people to find your content. Categories are similar to, but broader than, tags. For more information on the differences between categories and tags please check out this support doc.
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Tags provide a useful way to group related posts together and to quickly tell readers what a post is about. Tags also make it easier for people to find your content. Tags are similar to, but more specific than, categories. The use of tags is completely optional.
Source

Here’s a 101 Level  “How To” on tagging and categorizing your post, by iThemes.

If you read the WordPress documentation on using categories and tags, you’ll notice that in both definitions you’ll find the following: “also make it easier for people to find your content” and “tell readers what your post is about.”

The same verbiage written into both definitions.  Confusing.  So what’s the deal?

Categories are a useful way we organize our sites for ourselves and our readers. Think in broad terms like navigation.

Tags are essentially the keywords in your article or post. Keywords means the most important topics you are covering. Perhaps a nuanced detail that often gets overlooked but is important. Basically, it is a handful of words that are significant or relevant to what you are trying to say.

Search engines like Google are constantly improving their algorithms (the formulaic way they send their spiders to analyze and catalog every site) to ignore and demote blatant attempts to overshadow other sites by using false tags, unrelated links, and other sketchy means. As a result, tagging your blog and tagging it correctly is essential.

Further in the description of tags, WordPress says this:

“The use of tags is completely optional.”

Tags are optional only in the sense that you don’t have to tag in order to write and publish a post.  But tags are absolutely essential to be found by the search engines and your customers and potential customers.

More from WordPress documentation that on tagging, and this is important stuff, too:

Topic Listings
Your posts will appear in the topic listings of any tags or categories you use. Therefore, assigning tags and categories to your post increases the chance that other WordPress.com users will see your content.

However, you don’t want irrelevant content showing up on the topic listings or search, and neither do we. That’s why we limit the number of tags and categories that can be used on a public tag listing. Five to 15 tags (or categories, or a combination of the two) is a good number to add to each of your posts. The more categories you use, the less likely it is that your post will be selected for inclusion in the topic listings.
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Did you get that? No extraneous categories and tags because it is deemed “too many” and likely “irrelevant” and will limit your audience.

To grow your audience, make sure you are tagging your content with the appropriate amount of accuracy and aggressiveness. If you haven’t thought of tags as a way to increase your site traffic, it’s time to start. If you are over-tagging to appeal to a wider audience, stop this practice, and write more content specifically targeted to the audience you are trying to reach.

I hope this brief how-to answers a few questions for you.  And as always, if you want to know more, you are always invited and encouraged to contact me.

 

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Contact me for marketing, publishing, content writing and editing for SEO and social media strategy.  I am about your success.  Period.
Melissa I. Hassard

 

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Simple (Honest!) SEO Tips for Small Business

First and foremost, your website needs to promote your business in a clear, concise way to attract clients.  But how do they find you?  There is a lot of confusion out there about what makes for great SEO and what doesn’t, but it doesn’t have to be complicated.  Keep your website clean, keep it simple, and keep your clients’ needs at the forefront.  Your website’s contents should be of value.

Here are a few simple ways to increase your company’s SEO rankings.

    1. Unfortunately, a picture ISN’T worth a thousand words.  At least not with Google and Bing.  Image-rich sites may look incredibly beautiful but the search engine spiders won’t know how to process them or what to make of them.  Keep the images if you like them but please, please caption them well.
    2. Blogging  If you can write a blog about your business to inform your client or offer helpful tips, please do.  Having a blog gives Google, Bing, and Yahoo an extra little nudge each time you post.   Write.  Share content.  Your clients will thank you for it, too.  If you need someone to help you with this task, let me know.
    3. Web videos  Google owns YouTube, so it should be pretty clear why this would be a great idea.  Put together content that best expresses your brand, who you are as a company, and what you offer.  
    4. Maps  Your company address (or addresses), along with a Google map (or Bing, or other) to your location(s) embedded in your site is generally standard practice with most web designers these days.  It moves your rankings up, at least near your physical location(s).  If you are trying to reach a regional or national audience, consider adjusting your web content accordingly with blog posts and videos directed to specific markets that you reach.

Contact me for advertising, marketing, SEO and Social Media strategy.  Located in the Triad but with clients all over the world, we offer services ranging from complete SEO packages and Social Media management to custom-tailored programs to suit your needs.

Melissa I. Hassard
336-937-5319

Your success.  Our driving factor.

 

Brand Focus: Great Marketers use the word “or” more than “and”

Great piece from Beloved Brands, and wanted to share.

Beloved Brands

Strategy is all about Choices

“It’s all about choices” is how my marketing professor started every class.  He’d repeat it about 8-10 more times each class, sometimes after someone made a choice and sometimes after someone didn’t.  I still see a fear among many marketers to make choices–whether it’s a target market, brand positioning or strategies or the allocation of spend.  Good decision-making starts with forcing yourself to use the word “or” instead of keep using the word “and”.  

The most important element of Marketing Strategy is the exact area where most Marketers struggle:  FOCUS!

Why should you focus?
  • Every brand is constrained by resources—dollars, people and time.  Focus makes you matter most to those who actually might care.  Focusing your limited resources on those consumers with the highest propensity to buy what you are selling will deliver the greatest movement towards sales and the highest return on investment…

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Jack Dorsey and Twitter: Can you have a part-time product visionary?

On the Social Media side, some interesting history on Twitter, and a glimpse of their future.

Gigaom

New York Times technology writer Nick Bilton has published a profile of Twitter CEO Dick Costolo, and the challenges the company is facing as it tries to transform itself from a real-time information network into an advertising-driven media entity. But one of the interesting things about the piece isn’t what it tells us about Costolo or his background as an improvisational comedian — it’s the details that Bilton includes about the lack of involvement of Twitter’s co-founder and alleged product visionary, Jack Dorsey.

Although he was brought back into the company (with much fanfare) to help guide the product’s evolution, Dorsey is apparently not really involved with day-to-day decisions any more. So who is Twitter’s product visionary now, and what does that mean for the future of the service? According to Bilton, the co-founder has stepped back from having more of a day-to-day role within…

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What KitchenAid Learned on Debate Night: Every Tweet is Forever

Who’s managing your social? It’s important that your brand is represented in a consistent, professional way. Contact me for more information on managing your social media platforms. — Melissa

NewsFeed

The head of U.S.-based appliance company KitchenAid surely missed much of the presidential debate Wednesday night, forced to do damage control after a tweet published on the brand’s official account contained a disparaging remark about President Obama’s late grandmother. After Obama mentioned his grandmother, who helped raise him and died just days before the 2008 election, @KitchenAidUSA sent the following message to its 25,000 followers — now deleted, but widely preserved in hundreds of retweets.

The tweet sparked a massive backlash, and KitchenAid swiftly issued an apology tweet:

Cynthia Soledad, KitchenAid’s senior director of branding, then took control of the KitchenAid account to issue a follow-up tweet that sought to “personally apologize” to the President and his family, as well as to “everyone on Twitter” for the “offensive tweet.”

In an email to tech website Mashable, Soledad explained that an employee had intended to tweet the message through a personal…

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The difference between SEO and Social Media and why you need both

Basic guerrilla advice for building web presence, online marketing.

Q:  How do I get “found” by Google, Bing, and the search engines?

To explain SEO (Search Engine Optimization) to my friends and clients whom are small business owners, I use the metaphor of a large pond to describe the Internet.  Okay, a really large pond.  Give yourself a moment to think of how you would get found, should you find yourself sitting in this large pond along with others just like yourself.  Splash.  Kick.  Skip stones.

Blog posts, Youtube videos, and web content are all ways of creating those ripples.  Over time, steady contribution creates larger and larger ripples.  More ripples means more likelihood of Google and Bing and the other search engines finding you.  What are the stones you keep in your pocket?

Q:  I’m very active on Facebook.  Won’t this get results?

Yes and no.  Social media is not SEO and shouldn’t be touted as such.  You can Facebook your fingers off and it will not change your SEO results.  Your website is the best tool you have to find new customers and explain your company to them.

Your Facebook is perfect for reinforcing your brand and also a way to keep your brand at top of mind.  What do your customers and potential customers find when they look at your social media?  Take stock of your offerings.

There are loads of options in Social Media to consider beyond Facebook and Twitter.  LinkedIn.  Pinterest.  Tumblr.  Instagram.  The list goes on and new ones seem to pop up overnight.  We can help you sort through which pieces work for promoting your business.

Contact me for advertising, media buying, SEO work, or help with building your social media platform.  336-937-5319 — Melissa