“What Catches the Light” | poem publication

I am thrilled and honored to have “What Catches the Light” up on Red Paint Hill Poetry Journal this month. Love and gratitude to founder and managing editor Stephanie Bryant Anderson, along with editors and staff E. Kristin Anderson, Deidre Sloss, and KB Ballantine, for including this poem alongside fine work by poets Avra Elliot, Erin Elizabeth Smith, Jill Khoury, and Nicole Rollender. Read it here.

Publishing just five poems a month, check out this beautifully artful microjournal. Red Paint Hill also publishes chapbooks as well as full-length collections. Check them out.

 

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The 2018 Gathering of Poets | Save the Date

It has been a deep honor and pleasure to work on The Gathering of Poets the past two years with Richard Krawiec and Jacar Press. The Gathering of Poets will be held March 24, 2018 in Winston-Salem, NC at The Historic Brookstown Inn.

Following is the lineup of terrific workshops that weekend. If you would like to attend, visit Jacar Press’ Gathering pageon Facebook, or e-mail Richard  for upcoming announcements and how to reserve your space.

Lynn Emanuel –
Obsessional Poetics: No One Writes Just One Poem

“All obsessions are extreme metaphors waiting to be born.”
– J. G. Ballard

In this workshop, we will examine the ways a few modern and contemporary poets turn and return to a place, person, image, form, or event as a way of exploring and unearthing a subject. What can these forms of return teach us about our own poems? How can we mine our own repetitions or obsessions for new work? How might we delve more deeply into our own habits of writing and feeling? If you can, please bring a couple of poems to workshop that you might use as a resource for exploring your own poetic obsessions.

Photo by Rachel Eliza Griffiths.

Patricia Spears Jones –
Basic and Bold: The Uses of Contemporary Poetry

This Workshop is designed to engage participants with contemporary poets and the different strategies to generate new work. While the focus is on African American poets, a range of poets will be under review. The Workshop will be in two parts:
1. Participants will look at poems in the packet and discuss the work of those poets with whom they unfamiliar.
2. We will use vocabulary from two or three of the poems to generate new work.
We will use two or three poems as catalysts for new works. Poems by Gregory Pardlo, Ada Limón, Marilyn Chin, Maureen Owen, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, Adam Fitzgerald and Charif Shanahan will be part of the packet. Participants must be prepared to read and write, write and write. At the end of this workshop, it is my hope that participants will have created poems that they feel good about and have learned about.

Zeina Hashem Beck –
The Ghazal and the Poetic Leap

In this workshop, we will focus on the ghazal as a poetic form: beyond talk about the shape of the poem, the radif (refrain), the qafia (rhyme), and the poet’s signature, we will look at how the ghazal’s couplets can both exist as independent units and relate to one another and the poem’s whole. We will discuss how this quality allows the poet to create juxtaposition and make poetic leaps within a ghazal. Participants will also write.

 

Maggie Anderson –
The Poet in the World: Writing Political Poetry

In this workshop we will examine the ways in which our poems can be made from the intersection of local and global political events and our own lives as poets. Why is the term “political poetry” often seen as a pejorative? Can the necessary evidence, documentation and witness in political subject matter be expressed through poems that are also highly attuned to metaphor and music? What makes a “good” political poem? If you can, please bring with you one poem by yourself or another poet that you consider both “political” and “poetic” that you might use as a source or model for writing from your own political feelings, fears, and understandings in these times.

Gary Fincke –
Everything Matters: Deepening Experience in Narrative

We will explore ways of opening narrative poems, not only to move beyond simply “close observation of what happened,” but also to broaden the personal by associative connections to what’s learned in any number of ways—history, science, the arts, culture, politics, and the oddities of trivia. Bring along a few of your own narrative poems to re-examine for the possibility of entering again from another angle.

 

 

Sandra Beasley –
What We Talk About When We Talk About Voice

Voice is the most elusive element of strong writing. How do we craft language that feels compelling and unique? We will unpack constituent elements of voice—the recurring decisions made in terms of point of view, tense, image, sound, structure, and diction—and read examples of effective voice from noted contemporary authors of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. This seminar includes an extensive handout of texts and a generative prompt.

 

 

RED SKY | Poetry on the global epidemic of violence against women

I’m really honored to have had the opportunity to work on this project, and proud of the book. An important and timely issue — though not an easy one, to be certain — this is a beautiful book and I hope you’ll consider picking up a copy.

If you’d like a copy for review, please contact me.

Red Sky: Poetry on the Global Epidemic of Violence Against Women
ISBN: 978-0-9968036-6-3

For more information, including a full list of contributing poets and how to order, please go here.

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Pleased to be included in North Dakota Quarterly 83.1

I’m thrilled and honored to have a poem included in the latest issue of the North Dakota Quarterly. NDQ is a fine journal with a sterling reputation — please subscribe to them here.

This issue’s cover features starkly beautiful photography, and the content within is equally gorgeous yet harrowing.

North Dakota Quarterly is pleased to announce the release of our newest issue, Volume 83.1. Chuck Kimmerle’s lovely black and white photographs point to the chilly and sometimes chilling themes found in this Winter issue. On the cover, lines of leafless trees stand against the bleak backdrop of snow covered fields near Grand Forks, North Dakota. Stories and poems often echo that motif. [More.]

Deepest thanks to NDQ poetry editor Heidi Czerwiec.

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April at Tate Street Coffee House | Richard Krawiec & Crystal Simone Smith

Today’s the official book launch for Richard Krawiec’s Women Who Loved Me Despite (Press 53), and next Saturday April 11, Women Writers of the Triad is thrilled to host Richard‘s reading over at Tate Street Coffee House (7:00-9:00p.m.) along with Crystal Simone Smith.

Bios and poetry will be posted over on the event page– please make plans to join us for a wonderful reading.

WOMEN WHO LOVED ME DESPITEIf you’d like a copy of Richard’s book,  it’s available for online purchase at any Indy bookstore near you, and in North Carolina at Flyleaf BooksThe Regulator BookshopQuail Ridge Books & MusicCity Lights BookstoreScuppernong Books and Pomegranate Books.

Please support an Indy store!  Richard will be donating 100% of today‘s author proceeds to a local literacy council.


 

What have others said about the book?

Because this book is a dog song on the edge of the abyss, it’s naturally full of death—there are suicides, car crashes, lost children, and mercy killings (which, the poet realizes, are nevertheless killings). There is also some honest and eloquent self-talk. “I swim in the dense brine of old grievances” he says, and “I can’t stop the weeds from rising.” And yet, along the way, there is equally eloquent tenderness, especially about love. This, we understand, is a kind man, a man who nurtures, even when it’s hard. So we are glad when, in the end, from a stone and a branch, he finds joy. —Lola Haskins, author of The Grace to Leave

These are the poems of a life lived, their imagery taken primarily from the natural world but also from streets and vacant lots, back seats and back alleys. Women Who Loved Me Despite deals with fatherhood and loyalty, love realized and love betrayed, the lessons and misadventures of a man coming into his prime. I admire their small triumphs and celebrations, their refusal to look away from life’s pain, and their hard-won occasional humor. —Joseph Millar, author of Overtime and Blue Rust


bkRichard Krawiec is the author of two previous poetry collections, including She Hands Me the Razor (Press 53, 2011). His work has appeared in dozens of literary magazines, including New Orleans Review, Drunken Boat, Shenandoah, sou’wester, Dublin Review, Chautauqua Literary Journal, Spillway, North Dakota Quarterly, and Blue Fifth Review. In addition to poetry, he has published two novels, Time Sharing and Faith in What?, a story collection, And Fools of God, and four plays. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council (twice), and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. He teaches Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Fiction Writing for the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Courses Online, for which he won their Excellence in Teaching Award. He has facilitated writing workshops with children and adults in homeless shelters, women’s shelters, prisons, literacy classes, and community sites. He is founder of Jacar Press, a community-active publishing company.

Writers’ Workshop: Chapbook 101 | Putting Your Manuscript Together

SOLD OUT

This January, spend a Saturday afternoon working on your chapbook or collection of poems, essays, or short stories with Richard Krawiec, Danny Krawiec, and Melissa Hassard of Jacar Press and Sable Books.

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Three Beautiful Anthologies for under $10 from Jacar Press

A wonderful way to support a local, independent press this holiday season.

Three beautiful anthologies, featuring hundreds of celebrated poets- from Pulitzer Prize winner Claudia Emerson, to Macarthur Foundation Genius Awardee Thylias Moss, to National Book Award finalists Alan Shaprio, Sarah Lindsay and others.  (Plus recipes!)

GET ALL THREE for under $10

When you order The Sound of Poets Cooking and What Matters for your Kindle or Kobo reader ($4.95 each), you receive a print copy of … and love … for FREE.

The Sound of Poets CookingTHE SOUND OF POETS COOKING 

SOLD OUT IN PRINT  | Sometimes poetry, sometimes recipes- and sometimes the recipes are poetry.  Featuring work by five dozen poets, including NC Poet Laureates Fred Chappell and Kathryn Stripling Byer, and dozens of other nationally celebrated writers. The poems alternate with recipes written by the poets, their family members, lovers and friends. The writing is at turns sensuous, hilarious, elegant, and playful. The recipes range from Asian, through European, to Middle Eastern dishes, as well as regional favorites from across the U.S. There is something here for every palate, literary and culinary.

KINDLE | KOBO

what-matters-thumbWHAT MATTERS 

A beautiful and moving collection of poetry about that which matters most. Poems by Pulitzer Prize winner Claudia Emerson, MacArthur Foundation Genius grantee Thylias Moss, National Book Award finalist Alan Shapiro, Yale Series of Younger Poets awardee Fady Joudah, and 90+ other writers.  Questions, answers, meditations,and explorations on the why and how of living.

KINDLE | KOBO

... and love ...

After your order, e-mail us to receive your FREE print copy of …and love…. 

Poems by Marge Piercy, Sam Hamill, Dorianne Laux, Ron Rash, Lola Haskins, Stuart Dischell, doris davenport, Fred Chappell, Kathryn Stripling Byer, Alan Michael Parker, Michael Chitwood, Betty Adcock, Joe Millar, Nancy Simpson, David Huddle, Holly Iglesias, Dannye Romine Powell and 100+ other poets.

Lovers and spouses. Sons and daughters. Parents, friends, strangers, pets. First love, last love, dying love, passionate love, sad love, wasted love, devoted love; love of body, love of spirit, love of self, love of place, love of time, love of moments, love of love.

Love that shivers, fizzles, shimmers, love that fades, dissolves, grows bitter. Love that races ahead, love that lingers. Comfortable love. Edgy love. Hungry love. Discarded love. Love that can no longer be called love. Love too great to be contained in one word.

Love as sacrifice or companionship. Love as passion, lust, or fetish. Love as angry or kind, controlling or tender. Love that lasts, in spite of itself. Love won hard. Love lost. Twists,turns, calamities, salvation. The sweet, delicious falling in…

We’ve been lucky in love. Love has come to us in abundance. Or love has been withheld, denied, stolen, broken. We’ve stumbled on love, we’ve chased after love, we’ve driven into the storm of it. We’ve courted love. We’ve been stalked. We’ve fallen. We’ve soared. We’ve despaired. We’ve shared love, been lonely in love and been, well, awake–in all the ways that make the breath come quick–all for the sake of three words. Whatever it brings, love is the only thing that makes everything else ring true.