Big Poetry Giveaway 2018

Welcome to the Big Poetry Giveaway! To participate in the giveaway and to find other blogs that are doing giveaways, check out this post.

There are two ways to participate in the 2018 giveaway! 1. Just post a comment with your name and email address included. Please also let me know your first choice, if you win.  2. Host a giveaway on your own blog! See this link for how to host your own giveaway and have your site included, and also an excellent FAQ on the project.

Book One 

Fanny Says, poems by Nickole Brown. I am fortunate enough to have picked up two copies of this fantastic collection, and I want to share one! Of Fanny Says, poet Patricia Smith says “Nickole Brown’s unleashed love song to her grandmother is raucous and heart-rending, reflective and slap-yo-damn-knee hilarious, a heady meld of lyrical line and life lesson.”

 

Book Two

Red Sky, Poetry on the Global Epidemic of Violence Against Women, an anthology of work featuring poems by Naomi Shihab Nye, Tony Hoagland, Thylias Moss, Fady Joudah, Jaki Shelton Green, Hélène Cardona, Zeina Hashem Beck, and the work of 100+ poets in response to globally oppressive physical, psychological, emotional, and systemic violence against women. Red Sky  is a collection of work by established and widely published poets as well as new and emergent voices around the world and is a collection of what is dark, yes, within, but also what is light.

 

 

The giveaway ends on April 30th at midnight, at which point I will use a random number generator to select the winners. Find others who are giving away poetry listed here.

Good luck, and Happy National Poetry Month!

 

Reading GNOMON, by Cynthia Huntington

In the car rider line with a book of poetry, I find the world shifts into a slightly better frame for me. The beautiful Gnomon today, by Cynthia Huntington (Jacar Press, 2017).
A gnomon is “the projecting piece on a sundial that shows the time by the position of its shadow.”
From the title poem: “The apples are sour and hard./ The trees are dreaming/ the shape the teeth tore from the flesh./ Gnomon. The part taken away,/ shape of absence — mirror/ to the missing piece. You would know your beloved/ even turned away.”

 

The themes of love and longing appear over and again within the book; and this kind of love is next to the holy, and “there is no joy beyond this.”

 

“– we go on under stars, under the darkest/ clouds, we climb and descend, our feet heavy;/ we are tired — but everything is so astonishing,/ each moment so new. We go on; stepping forward,/ we ask: Are you here? The grass says yes./ We step into God every moment, stunned, dumb-/ founded, we meet him however we go, so how/ can we bear to rest, to cease discovering him/ over and over, in the next moment, opening …”

 

This whole chapbook works like this. “… climb and descend, climb and descend” … seeking and finding God at each unexpected turn, from a green star to a horse alone in a pasture. Love and sorrow, the sweetest loves, the sweetest joys — and every poem in this chapbook is a door.

Honestly, this is poetry I wish I’d written.

And just like the hike through the woods that you wish would last longer, this is a short read — only 20 pages — but what a lovely journey. And the poems, like trees, clear our heads, somehow remind us who we are.

The blurb on the back by David Rivard: “After experience is done teaching us just about everything it thinks it needs to teach us, we come back to desire, the one thing worth knowing. This time around desire shows up as a wild calm, dead center of whatever picture in which we find ourselves. These marvelous, subtle poems go deep, deep, deep into that wild calm. So subtle, so moving! I don’t believe anyone but Cynthia Huntington could have written them.” 

If you pick up this chapbook, let me know what you think.

Purchase information here.

Poetry Readings, An Interview, and much Gratitude

Deep, deep appreciation and admiration goes to Abigail Browning and Ray Crampton, for the tremendous job you guys are doing over at Tate Street Society, and for inviting me to come by last month and talk about Women Writers of the TriadSable Books, and some of the projects and work I’ve been honored to be a part of.  (You can listen to the podcast here, if you are so inclined.)

What a generous interview and you do such a professional job.  Thank you, thank you.

Also note that along with their literary interviews, In The Margins is also working on Robert Pinsky’s Favorite Poem project. Watch Sandra Beasley read one of my most favorite poems, Sonnet 43 (How Do I Love Thee), by Elizabeth Barrett Browning here.

Poems and loves forged during distance can be really powerful.
— Sandra Beasley

You can catch Sandra this Friday night at Scuppernong Books here in Greensboro, reading from her own work, Count the Waves, alongside Dan Albergotti and sponsored by Cave Wall. I’m looking forward to this. (NC Poetry Lovers: she’ll also be at Flyleaf this Thursday and at McIntyre’s Fine Books on Sunday.)

And along with being Managing Editor at Tate Street Society as well as an accomplished dancer and dance instructor, you can catch Abigail reading her poetry alongside Janice Fuller at Second Saturday at Tate Street Coffee House this weekend at 7:00pm.  Open mic follows so bring a piece to share.

With a lush thunderstorm as backdrop, the reading July 1st at Scuppernong Books with Richard Krawiec, Debra Kaufman, Kevin Boyle, and Ralph Earle was wonderful —  fun, engaging, relaxed — and we had a terrific crowd. All around, it was a beautiful evening.

Also a quick report that things here on the homefront are as difficult and beautiful as ever, but at the end of the day there is a back porch with a cross-breeze, a glass of wine, music coming from inside the house, and mostly blessings in the form of the amazing people who grace or touch our lives in their myriad ways — whose paths run somewhere near or right alongside mine — I am filled to spilling over with gratitude for you, especially my beloveds, who have my back or my children’s backs — who tell my children they are good people, those who welcome, inspire, and love them, who treat us like family — I thank you with my whole self. You know who you are.

With much love, always.

m.

 

April at Tate Street Coffee House | Richard Krawiec & Crystal Simone Smith

Today’s the official book launch for Richard Krawiec’s Women Who Loved Me Despite (Press 53), and next Saturday April 11, Women Writers of the Triad is thrilled to host Richard‘s reading over at Tate Street Coffee House (7:00-9:00p.m.) along with Crystal Simone Smith.

Bios and poetry will be posted over on the event page– please make plans to join us for a wonderful reading.

WOMEN WHO LOVED ME DESPITEIf you’d like a copy of Richard’s book,  it’s available for online purchase at any Indy bookstore near you, and in North Carolina at Flyleaf BooksThe Regulator BookshopQuail Ridge Books & MusicCity Lights BookstoreScuppernong Books and Pomegranate Books.

Please support an Indy store!  Richard will be donating 100% of today‘s author proceeds to a local literacy council.


 

What have others said about the book?

Because this book is a dog song on the edge of the abyss, it’s naturally full of death—there are suicides, car crashes, lost children, and mercy killings (which, the poet realizes, are nevertheless killings). There is also some honest and eloquent self-talk. “I swim in the dense brine of old grievances” he says, and “I can’t stop the weeds from rising.” And yet, along the way, there is equally eloquent tenderness, especially about love. This, we understand, is a kind man, a man who nurtures, even when it’s hard. So we are glad when, in the end, from a stone and a branch, he finds joy. —Lola Haskins, author of The Grace to Leave

These are the poems of a life lived, their imagery taken primarily from the natural world but also from streets and vacant lots, back seats and back alleys. Women Who Loved Me Despite deals with fatherhood and loyalty, love realized and love betrayed, the lessons and misadventures of a man coming into his prime. I admire their small triumphs and celebrations, their refusal to look away from life’s pain, and their hard-won occasional humor. —Joseph Millar, author of Overtime and Blue Rust


bkRichard Krawiec is the author of two previous poetry collections, including She Hands Me the Razor (Press 53, 2011). His work has appeared in dozens of literary magazines, including New Orleans Review, Drunken Boat, Shenandoah, sou’wester, Dublin Review, Chautauqua Literary Journal, Spillway, North Dakota Quarterly, and Blue Fifth Review. In addition to poetry, he has published two novels, Time Sharing and Faith in What?, a story collection, And Fools of God, and four plays. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council (twice), and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. He teaches Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Fiction Writing for the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Courses Online, for which he won their Excellence in Teaching Award. He has facilitated writing workshops with children and adults in homeless shelters, women’s shelters, prisons, literacy classes, and community sites. He is founder of Jacar Press, a community-active publishing company.

Three Beautiful Anthologies for under $10 from Jacar Press

A wonderful way to support a local, independent press this holiday season.

Three beautiful anthologies, featuring hundreds of celebrated poets- from Pulitzer Prize winner Claudia Emerson, to Macarthur Foundation Genius Awardee Thylias Moss, to National Book Award finalists Alan Shaprio, Sarah Lindsay and others.  (Plus recipes!)

GET ALL THREE for under $10

When you order The Sound of Poets Cooking and What Matters for your Kindle or Kobo reader ($4.95 each), you receive a print copy of … and love … for FREE.

The Sound of Poets CookingTHE SOUND OF POETS COOKING 

SOLD OUT IN PRINT  | Sometimes poetry, sometimes recipes- and sometimes the recipes are poetry.  Featuring work by five dozen poets, including NC Poet Laureates Fred Chappell and Kathryn Stripling Byer, and dozens of other nationally celebrated writers. The poems alternate with recipes written by the poets, their family members, lovers and friends. The writing is at turns sensuous, hilarious, elegant, and playful. The recipes range from Asian, through European, to Middle Eastern dishes, as well as regional favorites from across the U.S. There is something here for every palate, literary and culinary.

KINDLE | KOBO

what-matters-thumbWHAT MATTERS 

A beautiful and moving collection of poetry about that which matters most. Poems by Pulitzer Prize winner Claudia Emerson, MacArthur Foundation Genius grantee Thylias Moss, National Book Award finalist Alan Shapiro, Yale Series of Younger Poets awardee Fady Joudah, and 90+ other writers.  Questions, answers, meditations,and explorations on the why and how of living.

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... and love ...

After your order, e-mail us to receive your FREE print copy of …and love…. 

Poems by Marge Piercy, Sam Hamill, Dorianne Laux, Ron Rash, Lola Haskins, Stuart Dischell, doris davenport, Fred Chappell, Kathryn Stripling Byer, Alan Michael Parker, Michael Chitwood, Betty Adcock, Joe Millar, Nancy Simpson, David Huddle, Holly Iglesias, Dannye Romine Powell and 100+ other poets.

Lovers and spouses. Sons and daughters. Parents, friends, strangers, pets. First love, last love, dying love, passionate love, sad love, wasted love, devoted love; love of body, love of spirit, love of self, love of place, love of time, love of moments, love of love.

Love that shivers, fizzles, shimmers, love that fades, dissolves, grows bitter. Love that races ahead, love that lingers. Comfortable love. Edgy love. Hungry love. Discarded love. Love that can no longer be called love. Love too great to be contained in one word.

Love as sacrifice or companionship. Love as passion, lust, or fetish. Love as angry or kind, controlling or tender. Love that lasts, in spite of itself. Love won hard. Love lost. Twists,turns, calamities, salvation. The sweet, delicious falling in…

We’ve been lucky in love. Love has come to us in abundance. Or love has been withheld, denied, stolen, broken. We’ve stumbled on love, we’ve chased after love, we’ve driven into the storm of it. We’ve courted love. We’ve been stalked. We’ve fallen. We’ve soared. We’ve despaired. We’ve shared love, been lonely in love and been, well, awake–in all the ways that make the breath come quick–all for the sake of three words. Whatever it brings, love is the only thing that makes everything else ring true.